• Overview

Reykjanes, the home of volcanoes

Reykjanes, with its volcanoes and lava formations

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Take a private tour to the hotest place in Iceland

You will be traveling privately through the youngest part of Iceland, Reykjanes with i'ts many volcanoes and eruptions in the past and present. And you are in control of this magnificent tour. We will show you the hotest places in Reykjanes.

Walking on a moon-like soil

This Reykjanes peninsula tour gives you a good idea why Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin came to Iceland to practice their moonwalk. You will find out why this very place was chosen by NASA to be the place of preparation for the famous 1969 Appolo 11 tour to the moon.

Blue lagoon

Then you will take a giant leap into the Blue Lagoon and see why it is an experience for all mankind. The Blue Lagoon is an exeptional place on earth. Nowhere in the world you will find such a place.
The Blue Lagoon is a geothermal spa in southwestern Iceland.

Blue Lagoon Spa

The spa is located in a lava field near Grindavík and in front of Mount Þorbjörn on Reykjanes Peninsula, in a location favourable for geothermal power, and is supplied by water used in the nearby Svartsengi geothermal power station.

The Blue Lagoon is approximately 20 km (12 mi) from Keflavík International Airport, and is one of the most visited attractions in Iceland.

Water source
The lagoon is man-made. The water is a byproduct from the nearby geothermal power plant Svartsengi where superheated water is vented from the ground near a lava flow and used to run turbines that generate electricity. After going through the turbines, the steam and hot water passes through a heat exchanger to provide heat for a municipal water heating system. Then the water is fed into the lagoon.

The rich mineral content is provided by the underground geological layers and pushed up to the surface by the hot water (at about 1.2 MPa (12 bar) pressure and 240 °C (464 °F) temperature) used by the plant. Because of its mineral concentration, water cannot be recycled and must be disposed of in the nearby landscape, a permeable lava field that varies in thickness from 50 cm (20 in) to 1 m (3.3 ft). After the minerals have formed a deposit, the water reinfiltrates the ground, but the deposits render the ground impermeable over time, so the plant needs to continuously dig new ponds in the nearby lava field.

The water renews every 2 days.[2] The average pH is 7.5 and the salt content is 2.5%. Very few organisms live in the water apart from some blue-green algae, despite the water not being artificially disinfected it contains no fecal bacteria, environmental bacteria, fungi, or plants.